Archive for the 'PR' Category

The False Divide Between Book Promo and Author Promo

Imagine this:

After years of drafting, critiquing, revising, submitting and watching rejections pile up, you’ve finally landed a publishing deal and your book is coming out in several months.

Over those years you’ve worked hard, too, to build a platform — giving webinars on craft, writing articles that have run in places like the Huffington Post and contributing regularly to a popular blog  (maybe WU?) drawing thousands of readers from around the country.

Yet, when you sit down for the long-anticipated meeting with [...]

Envy: a Lesson in What Not to Do

A couple of weeks ago, an author in the UK named Lynn Shepherd made one of the more bafflingly boneheaded moves I’ve seen in a long time, by posting a blog on the Huffington Post entitled “If JK Rowling Cares About Writing, She Should Stop Doing It.”

Many of you probably read it, and/or saw the resulting kerfuffle as it spread across Twitter, Facebook, and the Internet at large.

At this point the cyber-flames have ebbed and the dust has settled, [...]

Ten Things I’ve Learned from Evaluating Self-Published Books for a Year

Photo by Flickr’s Fabio Hofnik

Today’s guest post is by Jessica Bennett. She and Leslie Ramey created Compulsion Reads, a website that seeks to shine the spotlight on quality indie books by endorsing those books that meet CR’s strict quality standards.

From Jessica:

At Compulsion Reads, we always seek to help educate and inform writers. I believe that my personal experience of reading and evaluating a large amount of self-published books over the last year could lend some important [...]

Power in Numbers: Authors Promoting as a Team

Kristina McMorris is the recipient of more than twenty national literary awards. A host of weekly TV shows since age nine, including an Emmy® Award-winning program, she penned her debut novel, Letters from Home (Kensington Books, Avon/HarperCollins UK), based on inspiration from her grandparents’ wartime courtship. Her second novel, Bridge of Scarlet Leaves, was named a 2013 nominee for the prestigious RITA® Award and is frequently an official reading selection among book clubs, universities, and libraries throughout the country. Most [...]

What it Takes to Get on NPR

Last week I heard a snippet of Terry Gross’ Fresh Air interview with Eat, Pray, Love author Elizabeth Gilbert. Gilbert has a new book out and was on the show to talk about it.

A bit earlier in  the same week, an author client had asked if I’d pitched her to NPR shows, including Fresh Air.  My answer was, “Yes, of course.” It always is, because I always pitch the authors I represent to  NPR — and to all [...]

Expanding Your Brand

I understand my problem exactly.

On the one hand, I have a lot of how-to books (on writing and on poker) which sell their asses off because they have just exactly the information that certain people need, just exactly when they need it. On the other hand, I have all these terrific novels that struggle to find their audience, because reading a novel is a recreational activity; in other words, it’s a want to, not a need to [...]

Why Authors Should Help Other Authors

photo by nicdalic

Author Catherine McKenzie returns to WU as our guest today, to discuss a topic near and dear to her: helping other authors. Catherine, who is one of the most generous authors we’ve known–working tirelessly to help promote other authors works via her Facebook group I bet we can make these books best sellers and in many other ways–has a new books out. Hidden was recently released in Canada and will be available in the U.S. next spring. Her other novels–Spin, Arranged [...]

Dos and Don’ts for a Good Self-Published PR Experience

“I published three novels at big houses to good reviews.  Now I’m my own publisher, and the media wants no part of me.”

So begins an article that ran last month in Salon.com.  Called, The Future is No Fun: Self-Publishing is the Worst, the piece is actually about the PR side of self-publishing rather than the overall experience.

While promoting any book is hard, it’s true that for self-published authors, it’s infinitely more [...]

PR and Marketing for Self-Publishing: Do’s and Don’ts

It (finally) appears the stigmas once associated with self and indie-publishing are disappearing, or at least waning – though in some cases there are new ones arising and there will always be naysayers. Let me clarify that while I think there are pros and cons to traditional publishing, self publishing and Indie publishing alike, I have always been a supporter of each and never agreed with those stigmas. As a PR and  marketing professional having helped launch several successful self [...]

Hacks for Hacks: The Basics of Author Branding

photo by Rupert Ganzer

The highway to publication overflows with cars: luxury behemoths;  sensible hybrids; nondescript, windowless vans with strange dents that protrude from the inside. Each bears the logo of the mechanic who brought it to life. You’ve built a car, too, with good mileage and a cherry spoiler. [Author’s note: The cars are a metaphor for your books.]

But when you get your baby on the highway, you can’t ignore that a metallic paint job and tilt steering is [...]

How to Work Smoothly with a Graphic Artist

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons(This graphic shows the lyrics to a classic Disney Song. Can you read it?)

Whether on a book cover, a website design, an ad, or even a whole marketing barrage, graphic design can either materially increase your book’s chances of getting attention or can leave it unrecognized in the mountain of competitors. This goes for the self-published as well as for the commercially published.

While it is certainly possible for you to do your own graphics, or rely [...]

Post-traumatic publicity disorder: More tips to avoid a bad PR (hangover) experience

Recently here on Writer Unboxed, the lovely Sharon Bially wrote about The Bad PR Hangover (and how to avoid it). A fabulous post – if you have not read it, read it too. You see, I’ve also had a handful of authors recently who have found me and relayed terrible and unfavorable stories of working with a book publicist or publicity firm (or other outside/freelance help) with an unhappy or very unfavorable outcome, similar to what Sharon wrote about. I [...]