Archive for the 'Business' Category

The Magic Trick to Landing an Agent at a Conference (Hint: There’s No Magic Involved)

photo from Microsoft Office

You’ve revised your manuscript, sent it out to beta readers, revised again, and now it’s cards on the table time. You’re bringing your book to that fancy conference that’s coming up and shelling out the cash for a session with an agent.  But how do you make the most of your 15 minutes of professional attention?  How do you even choose which agent to meet with? 

There’s no magic password or handshake that will guarantee [...]

It Doesn’t Have to be Either/Or

photo by Adrian Kingsley-Hughes

I was sitting at my desk last Monday, working on my new manuscript (okay, kind-of working, kind-of surfing the internet) when Tweetdeck alerted me to the fact that Random House was offering my second novel, Time of My Life, at a promotional price of $1.99. I was as surprised as I was elated: namely, very. Surprised because I parted ways with Random House (amicably) when my imprint was shuttered (R.I.P. Shaye Areheart Books – I still love [...]

One Way to Connect DIRECTLY To Your Fans? *Yawn* Email. Boring Old Email.

Image by Kevin Fitz

There are so many entities that seem to put themselves between you and the folks who read your books: retailers, Amazon (they seem to be a special category all their own), publishers, agents, publicists, media, social networks (Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, etc), communities (Goodreads, Wattpad, etc), just to name some of the most obvious.

In other words, there is:

You, the author –> some other entity –> the reader/audience.

Now, for the most part, these entities add value. [...]

Level 1 Experiment: Writer Unboxed Publishing. And the first guinea pig is ….

photo by Corey Holms

Greetings, lovely WU community. Kath here, back from the dead, with Therese. We invite you to gather ’round and let us tell you a story of endings, beginnings, and another WU experiment…

Prologue. The year is 2006. Kath is eagerly clicking open an email from her then-agent. She’s been working with said agent for a couple years now, shopping historical novels with a Gothic twist, but the traditional publishing world, awash in sexy dukes and vampires, with [...]

Navigating the Next Frontier in Digital Publishing: Audiobooks

Photo by Jeff Golden

When Audible launched its Audiobook Creation Exchange (ACX) back in 2011, my initial reaction was to ignore it. I wish I could tell you that this decision was rooted in sound logic, but if I’m being totally honest, the very idea of producing an audiobook just seemed overwhelming. This was at a time when I’d finally gotten the whole MOBI vs. EPUB thing straight and the thought of learning a new vernacular threatened to make my head [...]

Writers: What Are You Afraid Of?

Photo by Ourania

That I’ll only end up drowning in the sea of online voices. That no one cares. That I’m not interesting enough, attractive enough, young enough, clever enough, or technically adroit enough to catch and hold anyone’s attention no matter what I blog/post about, when, where, how, or how often.”

This is how Karyn Henley, an author I am working with described her fear of promoting her books. I had two reactions when reading this:

Wow – how honest she [...]

What’s More Important Than Knowing the Marketplace? Knowing Your Audience

A few months back, I tipped Writer Unboxed readers to a new self-published ebook project I launched, The 33. I used its unusual episodic format as an example to encourage storytellers of all stripes — traditionally-published writers, self-published writers, publishers and more — to thoughtfully examine the ebook marketplace and spot opportunities to tell and sell stories in new ways.

Today, I’ll share some of the insights I’ve learned since The 33′s debut, and encourage you to embrace another customer-centric strategy as [...]

The Four Characteristics of Author Attitude and Why You Need Them

Victory by sgatto (Flickr Creative Commons)

Today’s guest, Nina Amir, author of How to Blog a Book and The Author Training Manual, transforms writers into inspired, successful authors, authorpreneurs and blogpreneurs. Known as the “Inspiration to Creation Coach,” Nina moves her clients from ideas to finished books as well as to careers as authors by helping them combine their passion and purpose so they create products that positively and meaningfully impact the world. Some of Nina’s clients have sold 300,000+ copies of their [...]

To Pseudonym or Not to Pseudonym

photo by Giovanni Orlando

When I learned I was going to be published five years ago (wow, that’s crazy. Like so many things, that feels like yesterday and a lifetime ago), and I started telling people I was going to have a book coming out, one of the many questions I got that surprised me was, “Are you publishing under your real name?” My quippy answer was, “Of course, I want the three hundred people I’ve met in my life [...]

Why Your Book Deal Is Just the First Step

Photo by Jeff Noble

Liz Fenton and Lisa Steinke, authors of Your Perfect Life (Washington Square Press) have been best friends for twenty-five years and survived high school and college together. They’ve written the story of two childhood best friends  who wake up the morning after their twentieth high school reunion to discover that they’ve switched bodies and need to figure out how to navigate their altered realities.

Says New York Times best-selling author Sarah Jio:

I loved this from the [...]

Burying the Hachette

DISCLAIMER: The views presented in today’s post do not necessarily reflect those of Writer Unboxed or its other contributors. They are solely the opinions of the author of this post, and should not be read while drinking, operating heavy machinery, or reading the works of Clive Cussler (although it might be fun to try doing all those things at the same time).

I’m going to risk pissing some people off today, but I’ve been watching the ongoing Amazon/Hachette drama recently, and I [...]

The False Divide Between Book Promo and Author Promo

Imagine this:

After years of drafting, critiquing, revising, submitting and watching rejections pile up, you’ve finally landed a publishing deal and your book is coming out in several months.

Over those years you’ve worked hard, too, to build a platform — giving webinars on craft, writing articles that have run in places like the Huffington Post and contributing regularly to a popular blog  (maybe WU?) drawing thousands of readers from around the country.

Yet, when you sit down for the long-anticipated meeting with [...]