About Tracy Hahn-Burkett

Tracy Hahn-Burkett has written everything from speeches for a U.S. senator to bus notes for her eighth-grade son. A former congressional staffer, U.S. Department of Justice lawyer and public policy advocate for civil rights, civil liberties and public education, Tracy traded suits for blue jeans and fleece when she moved to New Hampshire with her husband and two children. She writes the adoption and parenting blog, UnchartedParent, and has published dozens of essays, articles and reviews. Tracy is currently revising her first novel. Her website is TracyHahnBurkett.com.

Recent Posts by this author:

  • Advice for Authors from a Bookseller’s Perspective
  • A Step-by-Step Guide to Conducting the Research Interview
  • The Un-Con Begins Tomorrow! (Plus, How to Un-Con on Your Own, Even If You Can’t Make It to Salem)
  • Imagining Beyond One’s Own Experience, or What the Fiction Writer Calls “Going to Work”
  • When We’re Forced to Work Outside Our Own Writing Boxes
  • The Art of Learning One’s Art: Class & Critique
  • Revision: The Ripple Effect
  • Discovering that the Biggest Obstacle to Completing My Story Was Me
  • After “The End” – The Epilogue
  • Writing Through a Rough Patch of Life
  • Take Your Characters to Therapy
  • Macro-Revision: Take It One Piece at a Time

  • A Step-by-Step Guide to Conducting the Research Interview

    One of the most valuable methods of research for writing a novel can be the in-person interview. Experts in a particular field or people who have personally experienced something related to your story can not only answer questions put directly to them, they can provide experiential, sensory and other details it might be impossible to […]

    The Un-Con Begins Tomorrow! (Plus, How to Un-Con on Your Own, Even If You Can’t Make It to Salem)

    The first Writer Unboxed Un-Conference begins tomorrow! (Applause, shouts of joy, cheers, hugs, panicked rummaging through clothing when you realize you have nothing to wear.) The Un-Con promises to be unlike other writing conferences. It focuses on the writing part of being writer—developing our craft, building our inner strength, and actually writing and telling stories. […]

    The Art of Learning One’s Art: Class & Critique

    Once upon a few decades ago, I was a ballet dancer. I wasn’t a ballerina in the true sense of the word. I wasn’t a full member of a company. But I was an apprentice to a professional company for a couple of years. I got paid when I performed, I rehearsed with the company, […]

    Revision: The Ripple Effect

    Earlier this year, I began a new draft of my novel. I’m still working primarily at the story level–focusing on plot problems, character inconsistencies, etc. Some of these problems leave me feeling either like my muse and I have gone a couple of dozen rounds with gloves on, or like he’s left the building entirely. […]

    After “The End” – The Epilogue

    Ah, the epilogue.  Tons of e-ink has been spilled about it.  Writers have tried to define it; agents have clashed over representing books that contain it.  Editors read epilogues with red pencils at the ready.  Readers approach epilogues like candy corn: they either love them or hate them, and their feelings about a book can […]

    Writing Through a Rough Patch of Life

    We all have them: times when life screams at us, “Pay attention to ME, dammit!  I don’t care if you have a book/story/column/career.  I’m going to throw a sharp object in your path and you’re going to run over it and BOOM!  The best you’ll be able to do is coast to a stop and […]

    Take Your Characters to Therapy

    “Every character should want something–even if it is only a glass of water.”  –Kurt Vonnegut Vonnegut was right, of course.  But we need to know more than what our characters want.  To truly empathize with our characters, we need to know why they want the things they desire. What makes our characters tick?  What limits our […]

    Macro-Revision: Take It One Piece at a Time

    In my first “real job” out of college, I worked as a committee staffer for a United States senator who had just been elected to his first term in public office.  On my first day on the job, my hyper-caffeinated, immediate superior stood in front of me in our office space that was barely large […]