About Lisa Cron

Lisa Cron is an experienced story consultant, working in the past with such entities as Bravo, Miramax, Showtime, Warner Brothers, and several literary agencies. She has been an instructor in the UCLA Extension Writers' Program for the past seven years, and is the author of Wired for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence. She can be seen in Writing Fundamentals: The Craft of Story, a video tutorial that is available now at Lynda.com.

Recent Posts by this author:

  • How To Become a Writer
  • Writers, UnPlugged: Lessons from the Writer Unboxed UnConference
  • A Reader’s Manifesto: 12 Hardwired Expectations Every Reader Has
  • How a Book Coach Can Jumpstart Your Writing Career
  • How to Listen to a Famous Author Talk About Writing
  • Why Writers Are More Powerful Than The Supreme Court
  • What Kindergarten Got (And Still Gets) Really, Really Wrong, Part Two
  • What Kindergarten Got (And Still Gets) Really, Really Wrong, Part One
  • The Importance of Letting ‘Em See You Sweat
  • Here’s What Both Pantsing and Plotting Miss: The Real Story
  • A Modest Proposal to Pantsers: Don’t!
  • Forget theme! Instead ask, “And so, what’s my point?”

  • How To Become a Writer

    Change is hard, even good change. Learning to navigate change is why we’re wired for story in the first place. Even when we’re caught up in what we might think of as mere entertainment, under our conscious radar the story is mainlining inside info on how to deal with the changes that we can’t avoid, put […]

    Writers, UnPlugged: Lessons from the Writer Unboxed UnConference

    I’m writing this on the Saturday morning following the Writer Unboxed Unconference in Salem, still under the spell of the one of the most amazing weeks ever. It was the absolute best, hands-down, no doubt about it, most transformative writing conference I’ve ever been to – and I have been to a lot. I want […]

    A Reader’s Manifesto: 12 Hardwired Expectations Every Reader Has

    As I gear up for the Writer Unboxed Un-Conference next month (woo hoo!), I thought it might be helpful to revisit some of the basic story tenets that I’ve been writing about here for the past two years (sheesh, time doesn’t fly, it vaporizes!) Often these tenets don’t come from the writing world, but rather, […]

    How a Book Coach Can Jumpstart Your Writing Career

    It happened again last month. A writer emailed to say that she had finally finished her manuscript and it was now ready for my professional feedback. “I’ve wanted to get it to you for months,” she wrote, “but I had to make sure it was finished first.” Uh oh, I thought. I wasn’t being mean […]

    How to Listen to a Famous Author Talk About Writing

    Over the past year I’ve spoken at a number of writer’s conferences, where I’ve met a great many fabulous, dedicated and talented writers and listened to a lot of keynote speeches by best selling novelists. And while just about all of them were incredibly entertaining, riotously funny, and full of I must remember that one, […]

    Why Writers Are More Powerful Than The Supreme Court

    These days it often feels as if we have very little power to change things. After all, how can one actual flesh and blood-type person make a difference in the world if the Supreme Court says that corporations, with their billion dollar megaphones, are people too? Money talks exponentially louder than you or me, even […]

    What Kindergarten Got (And Still Gets) Really, Really Wrong, Part Two

    Last month we talked about the trap that unsuspecting writers are encouraged to walk right into, nay wholeheartedly embrace, from Kindergarten on. And that is: to come up with a “premise” that is out of the ordinary – think: Jane woke up one morning to discover she’s an alien – and then begin writing a […]

    What Kindergarten Got (And Still Gets) Really, Really Wrong, Part One

    I’m often asked, “What’s the biggest mistake writers make?” The answer is simple: they don’t know what a story is. So instead they write about a bunch of big, eventful, unusual things that happen. And so although they may indeed devise a fascinating protagonist, spin an interesting set-up and write beautiful sentences, their story will […]

    The Importance of Letting ‘Em See You Sweat

    “Let me tell you a story.” That’s how my talk began last month at Furman University’s TEDx conference. The topic was “Stories: The Common Thread of Our Humanity.” I’d spent almost a year prepping for those 16 minutes. Writing, editing, and rewriting my talk. Memorizing it and rehearsing it morning, noon, and night for months […]

    Here’s What Both Pantsing and Plotting Miss: The Real Story

    In January I wrote a post suggesting that if some Pantsers weren’t successful, that maybe, just maybe, for those specific writers, it might be helpful to ask if Pantsing is a habit, rather than their inherent, unchangeable writing process. And, since that habit wasn’t serving them well, whether they might consider breaking it. It was […]

    A Modest Proposal to Pantsers: Don’t!

    Let’s talk about New Years resolutions — sheesh, everyone else is. So, what’s the big idea here? It’s simple: the goal is to find things you’re doing that aren’t working, and swap ‘em out for things that will work. For instance, eating fast food has made us (pleasingly, I hope, I hope) plump; watching TV […]

    Forget theme! Instead ask, “And so, what’s my point?”

    Theme is something writers often talk about, especially literary writers. You rarely hear a romance writer agonize over nailing her theme before she begins writing. Which might be why “genre” fiction often has more to say about the human condition — and way more accessibly — than, um, some of the more notoriously impenetrable literary novels […]