About Jeanne Kisacky

Jeanne Kisacky trained to be an architect before going back to her first love--writing. She studied the history of architecture, has written and published nonfiction, and has taught college courses. She currently fights valiantly to keep her writing time despite the demands of a day-job, a family, and a very particular cat.

Recent Posts by this author:

  • Musings on Genres, Shame, and Why Can’t We All Just Get Along?
  • Literary Hypochondria
  • On the Many Dreams of Writing
  • Love Every Word
  • How to Work Smoothly with a Graphic Artist, Part Two
  • What Not to Think About When You’re Writing
  • How to Work Smoothly with a Graphic Artist
  • Building a Plot of Variable Depth
  • Writing from the Discomfort Zone
  • How to Think Like an Editor
  • You Can’t Judge A Person By Its Cover
  • Test Driving Scrivener Software for Writers

  • Musings on Genres, Shame, and Why Can’t We All Just Get Along?

    I don’t tell my ‘academic’ colleagues that I write fiction. I don’t talk much about my non-fiction writing to my fiction-writing community. I LOVE e-readers because they don’t reveal whether I’m reading a steamy romance, popular history, angst-ridden literary novel, nineteenth-century article on hospitals, or an idiot’s guide to something technical that even my nine-year-old […]

    Literary Hypochondria

    It is daunting to be an unpublished writer amidst the stellar cast of this blog site’s regular contributors. It is even more so when in their actual presence. At the UnConference in Salem I recently had the pleasure of meeting a number of the regular blog contributors, and of hearing their insight, wisdom, and practical […]

    On the Many Dreams of Writing

    Lately, I’ve been feeling like my life is living me. I have dreamed of being able to make a living as a writer since I was a teenager, but after several years of being a stay-at-home parent/part-time writer, I have recently taken on a new day job. Since I started spending a large chunk of […]

    Love Every Word

    Everyone who writes likely has a favorite book (or a hundred). And within those favorite books are favorite passages. My most often-revisited books fall open to specific pages, the ‘good parts’–those which hit an emotional high, or which spark a resonance within me, or even those that had me so completely enraptured in their literary […]

    How to Work Smoothly with a Graphic Artist, Part Two

    This is the second of a two-part post that provides basic advice for writers on how to work with a graphic artist.  In the first post I covered knowing what you want, finding the right graphic artist, and the basic graphic design process. In this installment, I will outline money issues and mention a few […]

    What Not to Think About When You’re Writing

    In my last blog post, I promised to give more tips on how to work with a graphic designer, and I will (I promise), but not in this post. For the last few months, I have been immersed in editing, and my thoughts are not currently focused on graphic design but on writing. In particular, […]

    How to Work Smoothly with a Graphic Artist

    Whether on a book cover, a website design, an ad, or even a whole marketing barrage, graphic design can either materially increase your book’s chances of getting attention or can leave it unrecognized in the mountain of competitors. This goes for the self-published as well as for the commercially published. While it is certainly possible […]

    Building a Plot of Variable Depth

    Yes, you read that right, depth. There are lots of ways to describe the various moments of a plot as it develops, but I think in images, and when I think of plot, I see it in spatial terms regarding the depths of life it plumbs at different moments along the way. To me, there […]

    Writing from the Discomfort Zone

    Look closely at the picture.  The floor is not level; it has randomly-placed bumps. The poles are there to grab when the imbalance gets too extreme. There are no railings around the depressed central area. The colors are glaring and intended to distract. There are no chairs and definitely no overstuffed couches. There is no […]

    How to Think Like an Editor

    The importance of editing to good writing is clear, but how to become a good self-editor is not. Few colleges offer ‘editing’ courses. Writer’s groups are everywhere, but I’ve never encountered a self-editor’s group. There are a number of helpful books on self-editing, but they typically break down the editing process into task-oriented strategies that […]

    You Can’t Judge A Person By Its Cover

    This blog is about reading rather than writing. In particular, e-reading. I’m not talking about how e-books are outselling paper books, how you can carry a library in your pocket, or how and why you should be getting your work out there into everyone’s e-device. This is about how e-readers are transforming the basic experience […]

    Test Driving Scrivener Software for Writers

     I have spent my life dreaming of a clutter-free desk. Alas, I am a writer, and behind every piece of ‘finished’ writing I produce, there are hundreds of scattered post-its and index cards, scads of pictures, research binders, books, and file folders, all of which find their disorganized home on my desk or nearby surfaces. […]